Vintage Snapshots

found photos & other curiosities

Category: Interior Scenes

A 1960s Christmas

quirky odd 1960s vintage Christmas family poses with toy dog and closed-eyes cat

Labeled “Xmas 1966” on the back (click to enlarge)

Better late than never. This is one of my all-time favorites–especially the closed-eyes cat–and another example of how there really is nothing quite like a snapshot.

Advertisements

Looking Out

Vintage snapshot photo taken from inside looking out to street

Inside the Piston Parts Co., c 1920s (click to enlarge)

Portraits: Gun Dance

1963 vintage snapshot photograph of black boy dancing to record player while wearing toy gun

Space to move, 1963 (click to enlarge)

Thanks to Leonard Lightfoot for uncovering another great image. This has to be one of my all-time favorites. As I have mentioned before a time or two on here, there truly is just nothing like a great snapshot.

Table for One

Circa 1920s vintage photo of women sitting alone at dining tables

Dining Room, 1920s (click to enlarge)

Merry Christmas

Vintage snapshot of older man displaying his Christmas present, a bottle of Old Spice

Old Spice at Christmas (c 1960s)

Christmas morning, covered with presents. Old Spice, taken out of the box to display. I love this one. Merry Christmas.

“I Love the Ladies”

Vintage snapshot of woman playing piano, with sheet music and family portraits on piano

Edith at the piano (detail), c 1910s/20s (click to enlarge)

Vintage snapshots of people sitting at pianos are not uncommon, though this is one of the nicer ones I think I have come across — for several reasons in my view, including its composition/light, the framed photographs on the piano, the fact that the woman is actually playing rather than merely sitting or posing, and for the sheet music to her left. (See the full photo below.)

“I Love the Ladies” first appeared in 1914, and was written by Grant Clarke and Jean Schwartz, the latter a Hungarian immigrant born in 1878 who was one of the more prolific composers of the early Broadway era. Those early popular songs certainly had some great titles; some of my favorites from Schwartz include “Rip Van Winkle Was a Lucky Man,” “Why Do They All Take the Night Boat to Albany?” and “I’m Tired.”  For his part, the Akron, Ohio-born Clarke contributed to titles such as “Weary River,” “He’d Have To Get Under – Get Out And Get Under – To Fix Up His Automobile,” “There’s A Little Bit Of Bad In Every Good Little Girl,” and “I’m The Medicine Man For The Blues.”

Vintage photo of woman named Edith playing the piano with sheet music and family photos on the instrument

Edith, c 1910s/20s

Here is a link to the sheet music, and should anyone be interested in the place of the piano in early-20th century culture, I wrote a long piece that touches on that subject in connection with the jazz pianist George Shearing for another blog I do here.

A Cat Named After V-J Day?

1950 snapshot of a cat and dog, with their name of the cat noted as "V-Jay," perhaps after V-J Day

V-Jay, at home, 1950 (click to enlarge)

The name of the cat in this 1950 snapshot makes me wonder if he was perhaps born on or around V-J Day. ‘Victory Over Japan Day’, which marked the end of WWII, is celebrated in the United States on September 2, after the day in 1945 the surrender document was signed by Japan (although it also applies to August 14 or 15 — depending on whether one takes into account the time zone — which was the day the surrender was announced). The cat looks to be about the right age to me. If he was indeed named after the end of WWII — wow, what a great way to choose a cat name, and in some small way, perhaps a marker of how happy/significant a day that must have been for so many who experienced it.

V-J Day, by the way (the Aug. 14 version), was also the day the famous Times Square kiss photo was taken. The Leica camera that Alfred Eisenstaedt used to take that iconic shot was auctioned earlier this year in Vienna for about $150,000. The camera used to snap “V-Jay” is of course probably long gone, although who knows — perhaps it is sitting in a closet or attic somewhere. And as a final thought, how nice that someone chose to note the subjects and date. Even the “At Home” has something nice about it.

A Little Odd

Odd, strange vintage photo of two military men with light leaks

Circa 1940s (click to enlarge)

Strange light effect on boy's face in this 1974 vintage snapshot

4-12-74 (click to enlarge)

Prankster

Vintage snapshot of 1950s family, with boy's face a blur

Classic 1950s family, Laura Scudder’s chips, Sun Valley, CA, May, 1957 (click to enlarge)

I’m not sure exactly what the imposing controls were used for (I can’t make out the abbreviation on the back, though the date, city and name of the family — Schepler — are clear). I assume, in any case, that the boy was quite pleased with himself when he saw this.

A Blowout

1950s family at birthday party, kids blowing out candles on cake

The excitement builds, c 1950s (click to enlarge)

There’s just so much to like here, but my favorite is the boy with the glasses towards the upper left.

%d bloggers like this: